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iPhone electric shock puts woman in hospital

A 28-year-old Australian woman has been hospitalised in Sydney after she got a shock from her iPhone, according to media reports.

The 28-year-old woman told emergency services she was zapped while holding the phone in her Chatswood home about 8pm on Wednesday.

It is not known if the phone was plugged in to a charger at the time.

The woman was not seriously injured, but a NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said she was taken to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition for treatment.

Inspector John Brotherhood said it only took a small shock to interfere with your heart.

“Basically, if the jolt moves you, if it takes your breath away or if it’s at all a cause for concern, you need to get it checked out,” he said.

The incident comes a week after technology giant Apple announced it will launch an investigation into claims that an iPhone electrocuted a Chinese flight attendant who was making a call while charging her iphone. This week another person, a man in China, was also reported to be in a coma after suffering electrocution from a charging iPhone.

The Sydney woman is the fifth person treated by NSW Ambulance paramedics this year after receiving electric shocks from mobile phones, while hundreds more have been treated for injuries caused from household electrical appliances.

Ambulance NSW has issued a warning about the dangers of electric shocks or burns from household items after responding to 232 calls to triple-0 for such incidents since January.

Inspector Brotherhood said some of the electric shocks occurred when people touched power connections while their hands were wet.

“The build-up of dust is another concern because it causes electricity to arc, especially on power points,” he said.

 

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